What is your poo trying to tell you?  The Beauty Chef reveals how healthy looks

What is your poo trying to tell you? The Beauty Chef reveals how healthy looks

A gut health expert has discovered what your poop says about your overall health and what “normal” bowel habits look like.

Sydney CEO of The Beauty Chef Carla Oates said that while many people know that our hair, eyes, skin, teeth and nails all give us clues about our health, not everyone thinks about their number two that much.

“Boogie movements can provide a great deal of insight into our health — so healthy bowel movements are more important than you might think,” Carla wrote on her website.

“Your poo is always talking to you. Lifestyle factors influence it, be it irregular eating, alcohol consumption, stress and different portion sizes.’

A gut health expert has discovered what your poop says about your overall health and what “normal” bowel habits look like (pictured, Carla Oates).

When it comes to how it should look, Carla says the Bristol Stool Chart (pictured) is a good place to start, as it highlights the seven different types of poo

When it comes to how it should look, Carla says the Bristol Stool Chart (pictured) is a good place to start, as it highlights the seven different types of poo

Carla explained that recent studies have found that “pooing three times a day to three times a week can be an indicator of good health.”

Unhealthy droppings warning sign

* Recurring constipation.

* Recurring diarrhea.

* Severe abdominal pain and indigestion.

* Feces, which are always very smelly and often float.

* Unintentional weight loss.

* Red stools or black stools that cannot be explained by your diet.

Source: Health Partners

When it comes to how it should look, she says the Bristol Stool chart is a good place to start.

“This easy-to-understand chart, developed in 1998 by University of Bristol researchers Stephen Lewis and Ken Heaten, shows the seven most common stool consistencies across the spectrum from constipation to normal gut health and diarrhea,” said Carla.

Stool types range from “rabbit poo” number one to “gravy” number seven.

Types included in the list include type two, or “bunches,” which you can recognize if your stool is “sausage-shaped but lumpy,” and type three, or “corn on the cob,” which “looks like a sausage.” but has cracks on the surface”.

Type four is the “sausage,” which “looks like a sausage or snake and is smooth and soft.”

Whereas type five is “chicken nuggets” and this is easy to identify as it looks like “soft blobs with sharp edges” and is easily passed.

Type six is ​​”porridge” which is like chicken nuggets and looks like “soft blobs with sharply cut edges” but is a little more runny.

The final type is type seven, or “gravy,” which is “watery, contains no solid pieces, and is entirely liquid.”

Carla explained that each of the different types of poo has different meanings, from “mildly constipated” to “lack of fiber.”

“Types three and four are considered optimal,” she added. “If you aren’t already, we should all strive for that.”

The seven different poo types explained

TYPE ONE: RABBIT POOP: Separate hard lumps like nuts (hard to pass).

TYPE TWO: GRAPE: Sausage shaped but lumpy.

TYPE THREE: COB: Like a sausage but with cracks on the surface.

TYPE FOUR: SAUSAGE: Like a sausage or snake, smooth and soft.

TYPE FIVE: CHICKEN NUGGETS: Soft blobs with cleanly cut edges (pass easily).

TYPE SIX: PORRIDGE: Soft blobs with sharply cut edges (also easy to pass, but a little looser).

TYPE SEVEN: SAUCE: Watery, no solid pieces and completely liquid.

Source: The Bristol Stool Form Scale

The gut health expert (pictured) said a

The gut health expert (pictured) said a “healthy” poop should be “without extreme urgency and easy to pass” and shouldn’t take more than 10 minutes on the toilet in total

The gut health expert said a “healthy” poop should be “without extreme urgency and easy to pass” and shouldn’t take more than 10 minutes in total on the toilet.

“If you’re feeling constipated, try sitting on the toilet and taking 10 deep abdominal breaths to relax and let go,” she said.

“If you don’t get the urge to defecate, don’t stay – try again later.”

Regarding the smell: “If it’s consistently putrid, overpowering, or has an odor that you’re not used to, further investigation may need to be done.”

However, don’t worry too much if it’s not always the same color.

“Just as poop comes in all shapes and sizes, it can also come in a variety of colors, such as brown, black, green, red, yellow, or even pale white,” Carla said.

“We should all aim for a medium brown chair. However, this depends on your diet and the amount of bile present (this is what gives the feces its brown color).

Finally, Carla (pictured) shared the five steps to getting a healthy poop, and it starts with eating more consciously, eating lots of fiber and throwing in some fermented foods Finally, Carla (pictured) shared the five steps to getting a healthy poop, and it starts with eating more consciously, eating lots of fiber and throwing in some fermented foods

Finally, Carla (pictured) shared the five steps to getting a healthy poop, and it starts with eating more consciously, eating lots of fiber and throwing in some fermented foods

Finally, Carla shared the five steps to getting a healthy poop and it starts with a more conscious diet.

“Chew your food thoroughly, sit down to eat (away from screens), don’t rush your meals, and try to consume liquids outside of meals,” Carla said.

“Remember that digestion begins when you see and smell your food.”

Second, fiber always helps keep you regular, and you should make sure you’re eating plenty of fiber-rich fruits and vegetables each day, along with pre- and probiotics.

“Stay hydrated with at least two liters of water daily,” Carla said.

“The composition of stool is about 70-75 percent water – the more water we drink, the softer the stool becomes.”

Finally, include some fermented foods in your diet to promote a healthy gut and control your stress levels:

“Do whatever works for you – e.g. E.g. exercise, meditation, breathwork,” she said.

“The gut-brain axis can have a tremendous impact on your digestive processes.”

More information about The Beauty Chef can be found here.

Good foods to stimulate bowel movements

* Raspberries

Nutritionist Leanne Ward (pictured) shared the foods that promote healthy gut habits

Nutritionist Leanne Ward (pictured) shared the foods that promote healthy gut habits

* Lenses

* Chia seeds

* Oatmeal

* Pears

* Fruits and vegetables with peel

* Full grain

* Legumes

* Nuts and seeds

Source: Leanne Ward