The Queen’s granddaughter refuses to be a princess and works as a cheap florist

The Queen’s granddaughter refuses to be a princess and works as a cheap florist

It sounds like a Disney princess story, but it’s real life. Louise of Windsor, Queen Elizabeth’s favorite granddaughter, took a temp job in a flower shop.

In addition to serving customers, she arranges bouquets, fills pots with soil, prune plants, and collects cash at the register.

He earns £6.83 an hour, equivalent to R$41.80, less than the £9.50 an hour minimum wage in England.

The money will go towards current expenses at St Andrews, Scotland, where he will be studying English from September.

Lady Louise loves her grandmother but does not want to live in the center of the monarchy.

Lady Louise loves her grandmother but does not want to live in the center of the monarchy.

Photo: Blog TV room

Admission to the traditional educational establishment will permanently remove Louise from the London court and the relentless gaze of royal tabloids.

She could have assumed the title of princess and the treatment of Her Royal Highness since November when she turned 18, a date she had to determine herself.

Days passed and Louise still didn’t speak. For now, she continues to be called ‘lady’, a title proper to the daughter of a nobleman, just as Diana, descendant of an earl, was known as Lady Di before becoming a princess when she married Charles.

With a discreet profile, averse to the hustle and bustle of the monarchy, the daughter of the Queen’s youngest is interested in drawing, painting and horses.

“His Majesty must have influenced Louise to want to be free,” said British Dynasty expert Ian Lloyd.

Even without assuming the status of a princess, the young woman remains in the line of succession. It is 16. The abbreviation of this ordinal number is: “16th.” 16. Ignore in line of succession entitled to the crown of Elizabeth.