The coastal town of Maaroom, Queensland is under siege by a growing mob of aggressive kangaroos

The coastal town of Maaroom, Queensland is under siege by a growing mob of aggressive kangaroos

A growing mob of ‘bad’ kangaroos are taking over a tiny Australian town, while residents fed up with getting hurt in attacks carry large sticks when they go outside and try to run their cars over the animals

  • Tiny town taken over as residents arm themselves against a mob of kangaroos
  • The eastern grays have multiplied and are becoming aggressive towards natives
  • The 220 residents of Maaroom, Queensland live in fear of the giant beasts
  • There have been several reports of encounters with kangaroos, resulting in injuries

A quiet seaside town is under siege by an unlikely enemy, and some locals are afraid to leave their homes because of a growing crowd of kangaroos.

The 220 residents of Maaroom on Queensland’s Fraser Coast were forced to leave their homes carrying sticks and other paraphernalia to deter the aggressive roos while others tried to run over the animals with their cars.

Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service officials have asked locals to stay away from the giant eastern gray kangaroos in the area after attacks last year.

In July, a 67-year-old woman was brutally attacked by a kangaroo while out walking in Maaroom on the Sunshine Coast.

She was knocked out by the big loo before it started kicking her until a man attacked it with a stick. Then it turned its attention to him and chased the man away.

The woman was taken to the hospital with a broken femur, scratches and bite marks.

Kangaroos have conquered the small town of Maaroom on Queensland’s Fraser Coast due to a perfect combination of feeding and breeding conditions

Maaroom has been invaded by the eastern gray kangaroos, who are particularly attracted to the town's manicured lawns (pictured).

Maaroom has been invaded by the eastern gray kangaroos, who are particularly attracted to the town’s manicured lawns (pictured).

In another attack in the city, a person with spinal injuries and his friend suffered multiple lacerations on the arm.

Residents and visitors to the quiet seaside town were assaulted in the tide of kangaroo violence, spurred by some locals feeding the roos

Residents and visitors to the quiet seaside town were assaulted in the tide of kangaroo violence, spurred by some locals feeding the roos

The kangaroo population in Maaroom has been growing steadily and wildlife authorities have had to remove several problem kangaroos.

“Residents are advised to keep their distance from the kangaroos, handle them with care and retreat when they approach,” said Frank Mills, manager at Southern Wildlife Operations.

Mr Mills also said the kangaroo population is entering the city after residents have started feeding them. The animals also graze on grass that grows on local residents’ lawns.

“The kangaroos are moving between the nearby bushland and into the residential area…” Mr Mills said.

“At community meetings, we’ve received a tip that some residents have been feeding the kangaroos, which may change the way the kangaroos interact with people.”

Kangaroos have overrun public spaces in the city and wildlife authorities are warning residents and visitors to keep their distance

Kangaroos have overrun public spaces in the city and wildlife authorities are warning residents and visitors to keep their distance

Residents of the peaceful town of Maaroom (pictured) have been running around with

Residents of the peaceful town of Maaroom (pictured) have been running around with “big sticks” to ward off the kangaroos

Frank Mills of the Department for Environment and Science said locals used gel blasters to keep the kangaroos at bay, but said it did little more than

Frank Mills of the Department for Environment and Science said locals used gel blasters to keep the kangaroos at bay, but said it did little more than “get them into conflict”.

Mr Mills also said the feud between humans and kangaroos had escalated and residents were trying to defend themselves against the animals.

“We have also received information that some residents are using gel blasters to move the kangaroos while others are trying to run them over in their cars.

“Not only is this type of behavior a criminal offence, it will stress the animals and bring them into conflict with other residents. Therefore, we advise all residents of Maaroom that kangaroos can behave unpredictably and stay away from them.”

Maaroom's eastern gray kangaroo population has increased, and the giant mammals are becoming more fearless as they graze in the city

Maaroom’s eastern gray kangaroo population has increased, and the giant mammals are becoming more fearless as they graze in the city

The eastern gray kangaroo (pictured in Maaroom) can weigh up to 66 kilograms and stand 1.5 meters tall, they can be up to 2.8 meters long from nose to tail

The eastern gray kangaroo (pictured in Maaroom) can weigh up to 66 kilograms and stand 1.5 meters tall, they can be up to 2.8 meters long from nose to tail

Maaroom Caravan Park (pictured) is full of the iconic native animals, but townspeople have been forced to carry sticks to ward off aggressive roos

Maaroom Caravan Park (pictured) is full of the iconic native animals, but townspeople have been forced to carry sticks to ward off aggressive roos

“They’ve multiplied because we’re supplying them a Sizzler smorgasbord,” local resident Mark Sidaway told ABC News, saying that conditions in La Nina over the past two years have caused the “roos” to move from fast growing grass.

Maaroom Caravan Park manager Karen Sutcliffe told ABC that many people are afraid to leave their homes for fear of kangaroo attacks.

“People now walk around with big sticks,

“I’ve been wanting to go fishing for an afternoon, but I won’t do it just in case a kangaroo catches me.

“They’re just so fast you don’t know where they are.”

How to avoid violent kangaroos

How to reduce interactions with kangaroos:

– Do not feed wild animals. It can cause the animals to become dependent on humans and increase the likelihood of aggressive behavior.

– Keep them out of your property by appropriate fencing. The fences should be about 1.5 meters high and include a gate to allow animals to easily exit the property if they enter the property.

– Increase coverage of other vegetation to reduce lawn size and grazing comfort.

– Scare them off with blood and bone fertilizers, sonic deterrents, or motion-activated security lights that can discourage nighttime grazing.

How to Avoid Roo Attacks:

– If you are approached by an aggressive kangaroo or wallaby, keep it at a safe distance so it cannot kick or scratch.

– Hold up a stick or branch, or stay behind a fence or tree.

– Turn on your side and protect the front of your body with your arms and keep your head as far away from the animal as possible to minimize the risk of scratching the face.

– If you can’t escape from an attacking kangaroo or wallaby, roll into a ball on the ground with your arm covering your neck and call for help, try to roll to a safe place or crawl away.

Sources: Queensland Department of Environment and Science: Fraser Coast Regional Council