Scientists put a GoPro on US Navy dolphins and captured them feeding on sea snakes and doing “sideways eyes.”

Scientists put a GoPro on US Navy dolphins and captured them feeding on sea snakes and doing “sideways eyes.”

What a closeup! Scientists strapped a GoPro to US Navy dolphins, which are trained to hunt mines, and captured bizarre footage of them feeding on sea snakes and giving “sideways glances.”

  • A team of researchers attached GoPro cameras to six bottlenose dolphins
  • Among other things, the dolphins are trained by the US Navy to hunt underwater mines and defend themselves against enemy swimmers
  • Over a six-month period, the dolphins were spotted feeding on over 200 fish and sea snakes while swimming through a pool and in San Diego Bay
  • At some moments, the dolphins appear to give a sideways glance, but the sea creatures attract prey by rolling their eyes

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A team of researchers attached cameras to US Navy dolphins and captured rarely-seen footage of sea creatures chasing fish, devouring sea snakes and even giving sideways glances.

GoPro cameras were strapped to six bottlenose dolphins over a period of six months to capture audio and video of them catching over 200 fish and sea snakes as they swam through a seawater pool and in San Bay Diego off the coast of California.

The dolphins, which are trained to identify underwater mines, defend against enemy swimmers and protect some of the country’s nuclear arsenal, are being studied as researchers want to learn more about their communication methods when hunting.

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A team of researchers attached cameras to US Navy dolphins and captured rarely-seen footage of sea creatures chasing fish and devouring sea snakes

Although the dolphins may appear to cast sidelong glances, scientists say their eyes rotate to attract prey

Although the dolphins may appear to cast sidelong glances, scientists say their eyes rotate to attract prey

“The squawks continued as the dolphin grabbed, manipulated and swallowed the prey,” the researchers write in their study, published in Plos One on Wednesday.

“When fish escaped, the dolphin continued the hunt, and the sonar clicks were heard less frequently than the continuous buzzing and screeching at the end.

“During the catch, the dolphins’ lips widened and almost all their teeth showed. The throat widened outward.

“Fish kept swimming even after entering the dolphin’s mouth, but the dolphin appeared to be sucking the fish straight down.”

1660829302 18 Scientists put a GoPro on US Navy dolphins and captured

“Fish continued to swim even after entering the dolphin’s mouth, but the dolphin appeared to be sucking the fish straight down,” the researchers write in their study

GoPro cameras were strapped to six bottlenose dolphins over a period of six months to record audio and video

GoPro cameras were strapped to six bottlenose dolphins over a period of six months to record audio and video

The Naval Undersea Museum notes that the dolphins can technically leave the site: “They can swim away if they want to, and over the years a few have.” But almost everyone stays.”

Although the footage may appear as if the dolphins are glancing sideways, as they swim, their eyes rotate to attract prey.

The dolphins fed on a range of different creatures including bass, crocker, halibut, pipefish and smelt.

Researchers said it was the first time dolphins had been seen on video eating sea snakes.

The team of scientists also suggest attaching cameras to wild dolphins to see if their habits are unique in any way.

The use of dolphins in the American Navy dates back to the 1960s, and dolphins were used during the Vietnam and Persian Gulf wars. In both wars, the sea creatures protected the naval ships at anchor from enemy swimmers attempting to place explosives nearby.

“They are also trained to ‘tag’ the enemy swimmer with a marker so Navy personnel can apprehend them,” reports PBS.

During the Vietnam War, rumors circulated about a “swimmer nullification program” in which dolphins were allegedly trained to shoot at enemy swimmers with a device similar to the tagging device.

However, the Navy denies that such a program existed or that a dolphin was ever trained to attack a human.

Bottlenose dolphins weigh an average of 660 pounds but can range from 330 to 1,430 pounds. The marine mammals can reach a length of just over 13 feet.

Dolphins vary in color – typically dark gray on the back and light gray on the flanks, but can be bluish-grey, brownish-grey or even almost black.

The Naval Undersea Museum notes that the dolphins can technically leave the site:

The Naval Undersea Museum notes that the dolphins can technically leave the site: “They can swim away if they want to, and over the years a few have.” But almost everyone stays.”