Republican Civil War intensifies: McConnell tells Rick Scott that his “agenda” opens a party to attack

Republican Civil War intensifies: McConnell tells Rick Scott that his “agenda” opens a party to attack

Republican Civil War intensifies: Senator Rick Scott moves away from Mitch McConnell before his speech criticizing his Republican “agenda” that would “raise taxes for half the American people.”

  • Republican Rising Civil War Plays at Tuesday’s Party Press Conference
  • Mitch McConnell refutes Rick Scott’s 11-point interim mandate
  • He said he would raise taxes “taxes on half the American people”
  • But the party’s Senate campaign chairman was not there to hear it
  • Scott finished his own remarks and then left before McConnell criticized him
  • The debate is whether the party should make its own proposals before the autumn
  • McConnell wants the by-elections to be a referendum for President Biden

The growing republican civil war took place in the public spotlight at a party press conference on Tuesday, as GOP Senate leader Mitch McConnell has accused Sen. Rick Scott of proposing a political plan that he says will increase the taxes of millions of Americans.

But Scott doesn’t bother to hear McConnell’s criticism.

After he finished his speech for the president Joe BidenIn a State of the Union address, he stepped away from the rostrum and simply kept walking instead of listening to his leader ask questions.

He may have known that the first would be on the political agenda he has been pushing for in recent days.

McConnell, ignoring the departure, said Scott was behind him and was welcome to answer a question.

“If we are lucky enough to have a majority next year, I will be the leader of the majority,” he continued.

I will decide after consultation with my members what to put on the floor.

“And let me tell you what would not be part of our agenda. We will not have as part of our agenda a bill that raises the taxes of half the American people and closes Social Security and Medicare within five years – this will not be part of the agenda of the Republican majority in the Senate.

“Instead, we will focus on what the American people care about: inflation, energy, defense, the border, and crime.”

Republican Civil War intensifies: McConnell tells Rick Scott that his “agenda” opens a party to attack

Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell has accused Sen. Rick Scott of proposing a political plan that he says will raise taxes for millions of Americans during a party press conference.

Scott spoke at a press conference this week about Republican politics on Wednesday

Scott spoke at a press conference this week about Republican politics on Wednesday

But Scott did not hear the criticism.  After uttering his own remarks, he turned, left the rostrum, and kept walking ... leaving the press conference before it was over.

But Scott did not hear the criticism. After uttering his own remarks, he turned, left the rostrum, and kept walking … leaving the press conference before it was over.

The theater is currently showing a division in the party between those who want to campaign on a positive agenda and those who believe that the position of Republicans in opposition means that their job is to oppose the Democrats.

The display of the manifesto now simply provides targets for advertising for the attack, according to McConnell and his allies.

But Scott, who is leading the Republican campaign in the Senate, sees his 11-point plan as a conservative plan of action if Republicans win the House of Representatives and the Senate again.

It includes a declaration that there are two sexes, a shrinking government and a restriction on most federal government employees – including members of Congress – to 12 years of service.

His plan will also repeal all federal laws in five years, and says all Americans must pay income tax “to have the skin in the game.”

But that caused a rift between two of the most important figures in the Senate Republican campaign.

McConnell sees things differently and, judging by his public comments, wants to turn the midterm elections into a referendum on Biden, not on Republican policy plans.

Scott's 11-point plan includes plans to downsize the government, repeal all federal laws after five years, and limit most federal workers - including members of Congress - to 12 years in office.

Scott’s 11-point plan includes plans to downsize the government, repeal all federal laws after five years, and limit most federal workers – including members of Congress – to 12 years in office.

The same poll, published Sunday by the ABC News / Washington Post, shows that 50% of all adults polled want Republicans to control Congress after the 2022 interim terms, and 40% want Democrats to control Capitol Hill.

The same poll, published Sunday by the ABC News / Washington Post, shows that 50% of all adults polled want Republicans to control Congress after the 2022 interim terms, and 40% want Democrats to control Capitol Hill.

Scott received the announcement during a meeting of the Republican leadership on Monday, according to Politicowhen he was told that his plans could expose the party to unnecessary attacks in the autumn.

McConnell reportedly told the Florida senator that his proposal would give Democrats millions of dollars in munitions in attack advertisements.

In January, the GOP Senate leader was asked what he planned to do if Republicans returned to both houses in November.

“This is a very good question,” he told reporters. “And I’ll let you know when we get it back.”

Republicans are confident they will succeed in November.

On Sunday, Biden’s approval rating reached a new low of 37 percent in a poll that also showed that 10 percent more older Americans would prefer Republicans to control Congress than Democrats.

More than half – 55 percent – of adults disapprove of Biden’s work just before the president made his first address on the state of the Union, according to a poll by ABC News / Washington Post.

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