Psaki confirms that Biden will NOT wear a mask when he enters the state of the Union

Psaki confirms that Biden will NOT wear a mask when he enters the state of the Union

Psaki confirms that Biden will NOT wear a mask when he enters the Union state and doubles by refusing to claim that the guidelines have been changed to match the keynote speech.

  • “The president will not wear a mask tonight. But it’s different depending on the part of the country, “said White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki
  • Ahead of President Biden’s address, the CDC changed guidelines on Friday to say masks are no longer needed in low- and medium-risk areas, including DC
  • The House of Representatives doctor said Sunday that masks were optional, but the White House waited another two days.
  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told MSNBC on Tuesday that she would also not be wearing a speech mask.

President Biden will not wear a mask about the state of the Union, coming out naked for the first time in a crowded indoor space from the White House dropped its requirement for masks on Tuesday.

“The president will not wear a mask tonight. But it is different depending on the part of the country, “the White House spokesman said Jen Psaki said.

Prior to President Biden’s Union, Disease Control Centers changed guidelines on Friday to say masks are no longer needed in low- and medium-risk areas, including Washington, DC

The House of Representatives doctor said Sunday that masks were optional, but the White House waited another two days.

Fox News’ Bill Hammer asked Psaki, “What changed in science yesterday, Monday, as opposed to Monday a week ago?”

“It wasn’t really yesterday, Bill,” she said. “What the CDC has done is that last Friday it issued guidelines that identified recommendations depending on the levels of hospitalization in your part of the country.

Psaki confirms that Biden will NOT wear a mask when he enters the state of the Union

“The president will not wear a mask tonight. But it’s different depending on the part of the country, “said White House spokeswoman Jen Psaki

Prior to the state of President Biden's Union, the Centers for Disease Control changed guidelines on Friday to say masks are no longer needed in low- and medium-risk areas, including Washington, D.C.

Prior to the state of President Biden’s Union, the Centers for Disease Control changed guidelines on Friday to say masks are no longer needed in low- and medium-risk areas, including Washington, D.C.

The state of the Union requires legislators to be tested for Covid-19 before attending the address

The state of the Union requires legislators to be tested for Covid-19 before attending the address

“We are currently in a part of the country – in Washington, DC – where prices are very low. So her recommendation is not to wear masks, so we don’t wear masks in the White House.

But after Covid’s case remained low in the nation’s capital, Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser announced ahead of new CDC guidelines that the city’s mask mandate would end on March 1st.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told MSNBC on Tuesday that she would also not be wearing a speech mask.

“If I had small children or if I was around small grandchildren, I would do it because some of them would not be vaccinated,” said the California Democrat.

The state of the Union requires legislators to be tested for Covid-19 before attending the address.

Four Democratic lawmakers are missing out on a positive test Tuesday morning, and GOP Sen. Marco Rubio said he would miss a speech because of a testing requirement.

“I don’t have time to go take a COVID test today. “I only do a test if I’m sick,” Rubio told reporters on Monday HuffPost.

Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton also missed Tuesday night’s event.

Florida Sen. Ricky of Rio, Rick Scott, said he would decide today whether to attend Biden’s big speech.

“I have not made a final decision on this,” Scott told News Talk 101, according to Florida Politics.

On behalf of the House, five Republicans said they were boycotting: Representative Chip Roy of Texas; Representative Andrew Clyde of Georgia; representative Mary Miller of Illinois; representative Bob Good of Virginia; and representative Matt Rosendale of Montana.

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