Naga Munchetty jokes that Charlie Stayt wears a wig as

Naga Munchetty jokes that Charlie Stayt “wears a wig” as he reveals Liza Minnelli once pulled his hair

BBC Breakfast star Naga Munchetty jokingly claims co-host Charlie Stayt is “wearing a wig” as he reveals Liza Minnelli once pulled his hair “just to test it”.

They share the red sofa to present the morning news to the nation.

And in a new interview, BBC Breakfast star Naga Munchetty, 47, jokingly claimed that her co-host Charlie Stayt, 60, “wears a wig”.

Charlie joked that whether he wears a toupee is “an ongoing debate,” revealing that Liza Minnelli, 76, once pulled his hair “just to test it.”

It’s an ongoing debate: In a new interview, BBC Breakfast star Naga Munchetty, 47, jokingly claimed that her co-host Charlie Stayt, 60, “wears a wig”.

Speaking to RadioTimes, the duo were asked “about that other eternal question,” to which Naga replied, “Oh, you mean, ‘Does Charlie wear a wig?’ I always say, ‘Yes, he does,'” she joked, laughing.

Charlie added: “It’s an ongoing debate. It was even brought up by Liza Minnelli, who leaned over and pulled my hair just to test it. I suppose it goes back to the idea of ​​being family to the audience.

“You’re in their living room or kitchen late every day and they have the right to be nice to you.”

Naga agreed, explaining, “Newscasters used to be considered distant figures, people who would sit down and tell you the news, but now it’s all about being relatable.

Revelation: Liza Minelli confessed that her mother Judy Garland would have initially laughed at a 2018 remake of A Star Is Born

No way! Charlie joked that whether he wears a toupee is “an ongoing debate” and revealed that Liza Minnelli, 76, (pictured in 2015) once pulled his hair “to test it.”

“In terms of hair, I think we’re the only TV duo where the woman has shorter hair than the man.”

In October 2022, Naga admitted she was branded “fucking useless” by bosses in the early days of her career.

Read all about it: The full interview is available in Radio Times

Read all about it: The full interview is available in Radio Times

The TV presenter said she was “thrown” with copies and left the office in “flows of tears” when she was a print journalist.

Speaking to Radio Times, Naga said that the harsh treatment made her better at her job in the long run, saying: “I went home in tears for many days, but also I learned not to make mistakes, that mistakes were .” unacceptable.”

Naga said the incidents prompted her to do her research “double up and to the best of her ability,” explaining, “That fear of making a mistake meant you did your research twice as well and to the best of her ability.

She recalls, “I remember when I first decided I wanted to explore being on the air, I was told, ‘You’re quite sensitive.’

“You take criticism pretty hard and dwell on things. You gotta get tougher And I did.’

Web contacted the BBC at the time for more information.