Legal nipples on Facebook, but only when the Lgbtq community asks for it

Legal nipples on Facebook, but only when the Lgbtq community asks for it

For years, the social networks managed by Mark Zuckerberg have operated under the banner of A half (especially Facebook and Instagram) are at the center of a controversy surrounding excess censorship what applies to you. In particular, the Taliban’s stance on censoring male and female nipples in shared images is controversial. As a new “Braghettone” they developed one in Meta algorithm able to identify the nipples in the images that will be eliminated and reported in the most serious cases. Even when it comes to pictures artworkIt doesn’t matter whether it’s a painting or a sculpture. There have been cases where perpetrators have even been suspended or banned from social networks, but a penalty is still severe for the algorithms of these social networks, which more or less arbitrarily decide what visibility is granted. Well, the nipple detection algorithm is about to go to the attic.

The internal commission, consisting of academics, politicians and journalists, asked Meta’s top management to do so change the rules that regulate nudity. The reason? So far, they have portrayed “discrimination” in the emancipation struggles of women, transgender, intersex and non-binary people. The classic “straw that broke the camel’s back” was the blackout of two Instagram posts showing people’s bare chests transgender and non-binary.

It’s amazing how quick decision-making can be and how much attention there is when the voices get loud LGBTQ communitythat when they complained about the problem, they were listened to and their complaints resolved. But it is enough to go back in time to find in the news numerous cases of profiles being obfuscated because images of artworks depicting nudes were shown. The profiles of important cultural institutions were sometimes blurred, but always censored because their images were considered pornographic.

We can cite the case of 2016 where Facebook decided that the image Amor vincit omnia by Caravaggio, a masterpiece of 17th-century Italian art, was censurable because it depicted a male nude. The photo was deleted and the arts patron who posted it, Hamilton Moura Filho Desivel, was banned from social media. In 2018 she again censored the paintings by the Baroque artist Pieter Paul Rubens published by the Flanders Tourist Office. And we could go on and cite the example of L’Origine du Monde by Gustave Courbet or that of The incarnate angel by Leonardo da Vinci and so on: Dozens of cases have emerged over the years. But obviously the art is not worthy of attention and does not rank enough to be listened to. Unlike the LGBTQ community.