Issey Miyake, the king of folds, who made Steve Jobs sweaters for 169 euros

Issey Miyake, the king of folds, who made Steve Jobs sweaters for 169 euros

Issey Miyake wanted to be a dancer or an athlete before his sister’s fashion magazines opened up a world for him that made him the revolutionary designer of the 20th century. He entered the imagination with his pleated dresses for all sizes and ages – sexless before the word came into vogue – soft wraps that leave some air between the fabric and the body. Experimental and poetic but down to earth, he also made his friend Steve Jobs’ black turtleneck shirts. Issey Miyake tiptoed away as he lived and created. He died at the age of 84 on August 5, but he wanted the announcement of his death to be made after the funeral, without fanfare. A career that lasted half a century like that of Miyake, who at the end of the 1970s, together with Yohij Yamamoto and Rey Kawakubo, formed the trio of Japanese authors who, with their conceptual deconstruction of bourgeois clothing, forced western fashion into a radical renewal. He didn’t like to call himself a stylist, he preferred to create things and here he is smiling at the opening of the Making Things exhibition in Paris in October 1998 (Ap)