Court: Archie should not be transferred to a hospice to die

Court: Archie should not be transferred to a hospice to die

The London High Court rejected the parents’ request because a transfer is too risky. The devices that keep the terminally ill boy alive will soon be shut down.

Contrary to his parents’ wishes, the terminally ill Archie cannot be placed in an asylum in England to die. London’s Supreme Court rejected a request from the 12-year-old’s parents in view of the risks of a transfer on Friday. It was in Archie’s best interest that life support be removed at the hospital and not elsewhere, the judge said. In theory, the Court of Appeal could still be involved.

Equipment keeping the boy alive at a London hospital is expected to remain in operation until at least 2pm local time on Friday. The clinic had already announced several times that it would be turning off the devices, but that moment was delayed several times due to the long-running legal dispute over Archie’s fate. Archie has been in a coma since April. He suffered severe brain injuries in an accident at home in Southend-on-Sea, possibly during an internet challenge. The doctors who treat him see no chance of recovery.

The UK’s highest court supported the doctors’ decision to let Archie die. It’s in the boy’s best interest. A last resort by parents to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg was unsuccessful this week. Archie’s parents then tried to secure his transfer to a hospice so their son could spend his final hours in a calmer, more peaceful environment. However, the hospital refused: “Archie is in such an unstable condition that there is a significant risk even if he is placed inside his hospital bed, which must be done as part of his ongoing care,” the operator said. hospital. An ambulance transfer to a completely different area would therefore likely worsen your condition quickly.