Cardinal Müller: “A magical circle around Pope Francis, which also determines the appointments”

Cardinal Müller: “A magical circle around Pope Francis, which also determines the appointments”

In a book published by Solferino, Cardinal Gerhard Müller, former prefect of the Doctrine of the Faith, criticizes “the magic circle” that would exist “in Santa Marta”, where the Pope resides: “These are people who are not processed from a theological point of view »

Pope Francis is surrounded by a “magic circle”: a circle of people who are “unprepared” from a theological point of view and who also determine the appointments.

Cardinal Gerhard Müller, former prefect of the della Fede, in the book “In good faith” with Franca Giansoldati (Solferino), which will be published in a few days.

The “Magic Circle”

“There is a kind of magic circle around Santa Marta,” says Müller, referring to the papal residence in the Vatican, “made up of people who, in my opinion, are not theologically prepared. In the Vatican, information now seems to be circulating in parallel, on the one hand the institutional channels, unfortunately less and less consulted by the Pope, are active, on the other hand the personal channels, used even for the appointment of bishops or cardinals “.

«Unequal treatment of abuses

Müller, who had already criticized the pope by declaring that many “wounded by Francis” went “for treatment to the convent” where pope emeritus Ratzinger resided, also explained that not all were treated equally in the church for topic of abuse. “As a friend of the Pope, he was able to enjoy a privileged status. As a rule, friendships cannot have any influence on the progress of the judiciary, everyone must be treated equally,” explained Müller, in particular on the case of Monsignor Gustavo Zanchetta. And again: “Don Mauro Inzoli, a priest close to communion and liberation”: the Vatican court “initiated a case against him, at the end of which it was decided that he should be made a layman because he was guilty of a crime was found. Unfortunately, a Cardinal of the Curia knocked on the door in Santa Marta and begged for clemency. Faced with this interventionism, the Pope was persuaded and decided to change the ruling, adapting Inzoli’s ruling and noting that he remained a priest but with a ban on wearing the priestly habit or clergyman in public and not on congregations to present as consecrated. He remained consecrated, but could not show himself as such to outsiders. That’s only an example.”

Pressure on Latin Mass ‘was a slap in the face’

Müller then returns to the question of the tightening of the Latin Mass decided by Pope Francis, which – according to Ganswein – “broke Ratzinger’s heart”. For Müller, this decision was “a blow” to the traditionalists, who “digged ditches and caused pain”: “In acting in this direction, Pope Francis seems to have listened to a group of advisers, without considering that these action to do so would have the contours of a pure show of force».

The Becciu case

The former prefect for the Doctrine of the Faith then returns to the case of Cardinal Becciu and criticizes the Pope’s decisions: “Francis decided to severely punish him after someone went to Santa Marta to give him an article from L’Espresso , an Italian weekly that conducted an investigation into the cardinal. But how do you react to a press article? You can’t punish anyone without evidence of their guilt. This practice has occurred frequently in the Vatican, not only in the Becciu case alone, but it has even occurred within the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, when some priests were expelled overnight without justification. For Cardinal Becciu, the question is macroscopic, also because it is reinforced by the mass media: he was humiliated and punished in front of the whole world without being given any opportunity to defend himself. Now the end of the ongoing process before the Vatican court is expected. The presumption of innocence should apply to everyone, an inviolable good since the ancient Romans.


Article is updated…

January 20, 2023 (change January 20, 2023 | 18:53)