Burnt out Russian tanks on display on the streets of Kyiv as Putin’s invasion falters

Burnt out Russian tanks on display on the streets of Kyiv as Putin’s invasion falters

Kiev’s newest tourist attraction! Downtown Ukraine’s capital is being turned into a giant open-air museum of burned-out and captured Russian tanks as Putin’s invasion continues to falter

  • Footage of dozens of military vehicles in the middle of the street in Kyiv
  • Haunting images are a scathing indictment of Russia’s failure to capture the capital
  • Data suggests that 44,000 Kremlin soldiers were killed and 1,800 tanks destroyed in the war

Downtown Kyiv has been turned into a giant open-air museum of burned-out and captured Russian tanks as Putin’s invasion of Ukraine continues to falter.

Footage surfaced on social media today of locals walking the streets of the capital, stopping to look at dozens of military vehicles in the middle of the road.

The evocative image of the rusty guns is a damning indictment of Russia’s failure to capture Kyiv.

It comes as Britain this week derided the “poor performance” of its armed forces, as data suggests more than 44,000 Kremlin soldiers have been killed and some 1,800 tanks destroyed.

Dozens of armored vehicles roam the city streets

Tanks for the memories! Footage surfaced on social media today of locals walking the streets of the capital, stopping to look at dozens of military vehicles in the middle of the road

The evocative image of the rusty guns is a damning indictment of Russia's failure to capture Kyiv

The evocative image of the rusty guns is a damning indictment of Russia’s failure to capture Kyiv

A daily intelligence report from the Ministry of Defense says Moscow has lost a large number of main battle tanks because they were not equipped with explosive reactive armor technology – or ERA.

“When used correctly, ERA reduces the effectiveness of incoming projectiles before they hit the tank,” the report states. “This suggests that the Russian armed forces have failed to correct a culture of poor ERA use dating back to the First Chechen War in 1994.”

The report added: “It is very likely that many Russian tank crews lack the training to maintain ERA, resulting in either poor explosive element matching or omitting them altogether.”

British officials said “the war has witnessed numerous failures by Russian commanders in enforcing low-level combat discipline,” adding, “The impact of these failures is likely a major factor in the poor performance of Russian forces.”

Data released by the Ukrainian military says their forces killed more than 44,000 Russian soldiers and destroyed about 1,800 tanks.

Other estimates, such as those by Oryx — a military blog that tracks Russian casualties since the war began — put Moscow’s equipment losses even higher.

Oryx, which tracks casualties using visual confirmation, says more than 5,000 Russian military vehicles were either destroyed, damaged or seized by Ukrainian forces — including more than 3,000 tanks.

Moscow boldly expected to capture Kyiv in a few days. Instead, Putin’s troops are engaged in a protracted conflict against a fierce Ukrainian resistance.

While Russia has employed Soviet-era tactics and military hardware, Ukraine has deployed smaller, more mobile units – to great effect – that can attack targets and quickly withdraw from danger before the invaders can react – allowing Ukraine to take control of Russia’s Advance and stop in some regions push it back.

Britain has supplied Ukraine with nearly 7,000 anti-tank missiles since Putin’s forces invaded the country on February 24, while Kyiv has also effectively used US-supplied weapons, most notably the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS). Russia has taken a number of severe blows because of Kyiv’s advanced weaponry.

Dozens of videos have shown Ukrainian forces destroying Russian tanks and other armored vehicles, using drones to track the slow-moving hardware while attacking them with artillery and missiles, such as the highly mobile Javelin missile that it Allows foot soldiers to destroy tanks in close combat.