Around 230 million Americans will experience record-breaking temperatures this week

Around 230 million Americans will experience record-breaking temperatures this week

The devastating heat wave that swept the southwestern United States this weekend is moving east this week.

It is estimated that 230 million people will see temperatures of 90°F in the coming days, with 45 million of them seeing their thermostats hit the triple digits.

Around 140 cities will experience record-breaking temperatures this week, with the heatwave potentially extending to Michigan. Iowa is also expected to suffer from temperatures around 100F.

While Chicago and Minneapolis will have temperatures in the upper 90s by mid-week. A heat warning is in effect in the Windy City until June 15.

Indiana is expected to experience temperatures in the mid-90s accompanied by thunderstorms Monday, WISHTV reports.

Although the hottest day of the week in Hoosier state will be Tuesday, temperatures are expected to be in the upper 90’s. Those temperatures will continue through Friday when it dips into the 80s.

At least one utility company has warned of rolling blackouts that could hit Indiana during the heatwave, WDRB reports. Running blackouts are power outages that last between 15 and 30 minutes before “rolling” to another area.

Neighboring Ohio will see temperatures in the 90s Tuesday through Thursday.

Around 230 million Americans will experience record breaking temperatures this week St. Louis is one of the cities in the valley where temperatures are set to climb close to 110F this week

St. Louis is one of the cities in the valley where temperatures are set to climb close to 110F this week

Temperatures in Louisville, Kentucky are expected to be in the upper 90s during the day Tuesday, falling into the 80s only by nightfall. Highs in the city will remain at these levels until next Saturday when they fall to 85.

Tennessee residents are being warned to expect temperatures in the 90s that will feel like the 100s thanks to winds blowing off the Gulf of Mexico bringing humidity and creating humidity in the region. These temperatures will continue through Thursday.

Kansas will experience temperatures in the mid to high 90s for the next few days that will feel like around 100 to 105F due to humidity.

A record will also be broken in St. Louis when Tuesday’s expected 101F hits the previous record of 97F. The temperature remains in the triple digits this week.

Temperatures range from 100 to 105°F throughout the week on South Carolina’s east coast.

So is North Carolina, where Charlotte is expected to break its June temperature record, which was set back in 1958 when temperatures hit 97F.

Recovery for the Carolinas in the heat wave will be mild at best with 90F forecast for next Saturday.

1655061450 308 More than 70 million people are under heat warning this

Current models show that the heatwave will retreat west late next week, although central Texans won’t get a break as temperatures in the area will remain close to 100F throughout the week.

Phoenix will experience another day of temperatures reaching 114F on Thursday, according to The Weather Channel. The city reached this record number on Sunday.

The National Weather Service said Los Angels County will see “potentially dangerous” temperatures in the area again by Thursday. Temperatures hit 100F in some inland areas in LA County over the weekend.

Meteorologist Jenn Varian warned of high temperatures at night, which can lead to sleep disorders.

Varian said, “When we have very warm temperatures at night, your body just isn’t able to cool down properly, which in itself can cause complications, but also makes you less prepared for the heat of the day,” according to CNN.

Throughout the weekend, more than 70 million Americans were on heat alert after Phoenix, Las Vegas, Denver and California’s Death Valley recorded record temperatures on Saturday as dangerous and “potentially deadly” heat swept across the American Southwest to the Gulf Coast.

Las Vegas set a daily record from 1956, with temperatures soaring to 109°F on Saturday.

Denver, Colorado hit 100°F on Saturday, matching a record set in 2013 for both the high temperature and the earliest calendar day to reach 100°F. High heat is expected to persist in the area through Tuesday, where conditions will drop to the mid-80s Fahrenheit.

Several states in the US saw temperatures rise as a heat wave set in.  Cities like Las Vegas, Phoenix and Denver posted record highs in June last week, while California's Death Valley also observed scorching temperatures.  More heat is expected in areas between the Ohio Valley and the Gulf Coast this week

Several states in the US saw temperatures rise as a heat wave set in. Cities like Las Vegas, Phoenix and Denver posted record highs in June last week, while California’s Death Valley also observed scorching temperatures. More heat is expected in areas between the Ohio Valley and the Gulf Coast this week

Meteorologists are warning of dangerously high temperatures in much of the US Southwest, Arizona, interior Southern California and Death Valley as the region grips high heat.  Pictured: A woman relaxing in the cool waters of the American River as the temperature climbs above 100F in Sacramento, California

Meteorologists are warning of dangerously high temperatures in much of the US Southwest, Arizona, interior Southern California and Death Valley as the region grips high heat. Pictured: A woman relaxing in the cool waters of the American River as the temperature climbs above 100F in Sacramento, California

Excessive heat, like that recently observed in Phoenix, Arizona, causes more deaths in the US than other weather-related disasters, including hurricanes, floods and tornadoes combined.  Pictured: A couple of midday hikers pose for a photo in the Hole in the Rock at Papago Park in Phoenix on Friday

Excessive heat, like that recently observed in Phoenix, Arizona, causes more deaths in the US than other weather-related disasters, including hurricanes, floods and tornadoes combined. Pictured: A couple of midday hikers pose for a photo in the Hole in the Rock at Papago Park in Phoenix on Friday

Temperatures in several inland areas of southeastern California hit triple digits on Saturday afternoon, with a record high of 122F in Death Valley on June 11.

Excessive heat warnings and heat advisories have also been issued for parts of northern California through the Central Valley and down into the southeastern deserts.

The National Weather Service also predicted 114F in Palm Springs and temperatures around 100F in the San Joaquin Valley and Sacramento area.

The heat was expected to spread to parts of the interior of the San Francisco Bay Area, but most of California’s coastal zones remained free of heat warnings.

Temperatures have skyrocketed in parts of the Ohio Valley, the South and Death Valley as a heat wave settles in several parts of the country

Temperatures have skyrocketed in parts of the Ohio Valley, the South and Death Valley as a heat wave settles in several parts of the country

The National Weather Service said last week that Phoenix had 113F (45C) weather, just one degree below the 1918 record

The National Weather Service said last week that Phoenix had 113F (45C) weather, just one degree below the 1918 record

States including Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California have all been given excessive heat advice due to temperatures hitting triple digits over the past week

States including Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California have all been given excessive heat advice due to temperatures hitting triple digits over the past week

San Francisco has maintained its warm, cool weather, although more inland locations not too far from the Bay Area have climbed above 100 °F (38 °C).

San Francisco has maintained its warm, cool weather, although more inland locations not too far from the Bay Area have climbed above 100 °F (38 °C).

They have urged the public to limit outdoor activities.

Temperatures also hit triple digits in parts of New Mexico and Texas over the weekend, which will likely continue through most of the coming week.

During the heatwave, electricity consumption in Texas broke an all-time record, according to the Texas Tribune. Despite the high usage, no major power outages have been reported in the state.

Albuquerque saw a record high of 100F on Friday and will flirt in the high 90s for the rest of the week.

Phoenix could see temperatures as high as 110F on Sunday, while cities like San Antonio, Houston, Dallas and Austin will also be in triple digits. Some parts of Nebraska are also expected to hit 100 to 105F.

Next week, temperatures in the Ohio Valley and central US will soar to 38°C (100°F) and possibly 40°C (105°F).  Pictured: A National Weather Service alert for the North Platte, Nebraska area

Next week, temperatures in the Ohio Valley and central US will soar to 38°C (100°F) and possibly 40°C (105°F). Pictured: A National Weather Service alert for the North Platte, Nebraska area

On Thursday, the weather in Phoenix could reach 113F, just nine degrees cooler than the hottest temperature on record in the area — 122Fin 1990, according to AZ Family.

Temperatures will also rise 20 to 30 degrees higher than usual in the Ohio Valley, passing 90F later this week after severe thunderstorms.

On Monday, highs of at least 95-100F will be set in Columbus, Charleston and Indianapolis, while St. Louis and Kansas City could also reach 100F.

The same conditions are expected to continue in the region through Wednesday, as well as much of the Midwest.

Heat is part and parcel of summertime in the desert, but according to weather forecasts, that doesn’t mean people should be comfortable.

Excessive heat causes more deaths in the US than other weather-related disasters, including hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes combined.

Meteorologists are advising people in these affected areas to drink more water than usual wherever they are during peak heat periods.

Wearing protection, including hats, sunscreen and sunglasses, is also recommended. Wearing dark clothing is not recommended, as black clothing often transfers heat to the skin, making a person hotter.

Scientists say that due to climate change and a deepening drought, more frequent and intense heat waves are likely in the future.