A restaurateur takes revenge: He takes the garbage back from his container and buries the perpetrator’s car

A restaurateur takes revenge: He takes the garbage back from his container and buries the perpetrator’s car

The owner of a restaurant in Gatineau got revenge on a citizen who came in the middle of the night to throw his garbage in his shop by returning his garbage bags, thanks to the citizen’s address that could be seen on an old cardboard box.

“It’s not the first time it’s happened at the restaurant. And since the person put a lot of energy into filling our containers, this time I put just as much into giving them their bins back,” says Claude Roy, owner of La Destination restaurant.

PHOTO BY FACEBOOK LA DESTINATION RESTAURANT

Its manager, who had the impression that the containers were fuller than the day before, discovered the rose pot on Wednesday morning after observing the surveillance cameras. We see a black Mazda making several round trips between 3am and 4am to dispose of the rubbish in the bins of this restaurant on Rue Masson.

PHOTO BY FACEBOOK LA DESTINATION RESTAURANT

“After that our recycling was full and a good chunk of our dumpster,” regrets Mr Roy, who estimates the person left around thirty large black bags.

The restaurateur accidentally found the details of the defaulting citizen, whose real address and telephone number were visible on a discarded delivery box.

Costly for traders

“I only brought him a quarter of the trash in his yard. Above all, I wanted to send a message. It has to stop because it’s costing us dearly,” emphasizes Claude Roy.

The merchant pays about $1,000 a month for the private company to pick up the restaurant’s waste. “And if we have to stack it next to the container because it overflows, we have to pay for another lift,” he explains.

PHOTO BY FACEBOOK LA DESTINATION RESTAURANT

In September 2019, the City of Gatineau introduced a trash policy that authorized households to place a single 40-gallon trash can on the street every two weeks during collection. However, citizens can buy labels for about 50 cents each, which they stick on the collars of the excess bags.